Episode 302: Loaded Baked Potatoes, Mushroom Steaks, and Weight

These potatoes are hoping to get loaded.

In our food news segment this week, we were talking about Melissa Clark’s recent Meat Lover’s Guide to Eating Less Meat in the New York Times. (Great recipes at the link!)

In our What’s for Dinner segment, it’s all about the loaded baked potato.

In How’d You Make That? Joy talks about her recent maitake mushroom “steaks.” (Joy didn’t follow this recipe exactly but it gave her enough inspiration for quick-and-dirty lunchtime version.)

We are wondering if it’s even possible to write or talk about food and eating as it relates to body weight without somehow inadvertently contributing to weight stigma. Share your thoughts.

And in What We’re Loving: It’s remodeled Aldi stores!

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4 thoughts on “Episode 302: Loaded Baked Potatoes, Mushroom Steaks, and Weight”

  1. Hi Marisa and Joy,

    Just wanted to say that I love your podcast and have been a fan for the past couple of years. I have some thoughts on today’s section on food and weight. I am psychotherapist who works with people with eating disorders so this topic interests me. I’m also viewing it from a mental health perspective so I’m definitely not a doctor! I agree with a lot of Marisa’s points on how society puts value judgments on bodies and food. There is a lot of shame and judgment imbedded in diet culture that can be oppressive, especially to those in larger bodies. Which is why I agree with Joy’s point on why people should NOT be shamed for wanting to lose weight and that body autonomy is important. Shaming people is never helpful. I think weight isn’t always an indicator of health nor is it a health behavior. Diet culture sends a message that body size and weight is always within one’s control and can be “fixed” which is simply not the case. Many things such as genetics are out of a person’s control. You might already be aware of this but if you aren’t, I recommend reading up on Health at Every Size as it covers some of the points both of you mentioned in the podcast. I’m a big fan of intuitive eating because it strips those external rules and judgments around food and encourages you to listen your body. And it’s highly adaptable to any lifestyle needs/wants (heart health, diabetes, celiac, vegetarian/ vegan). Thanks for listening 🙂

    1. Thanks Christine! Can you believe we recorded that podcast BEFORE the business with Jillian Michaels and Lizzo???? My feeling about weight is that it doesn’t tell you the whole story of your health, but it’s part of your own story with health. And that’s a story that is between you and doctor unless you want to share it with others. We all have one body in life and how we want to live in it is personal. Obviously the vast majority of diets don’t work. Yet many people want to make an effort to improve their health metrics by implementing habits that often (but not always) result in weight loss. I have read several books and hundreds of articles on Health at Every Size. I am luke warm on intuitive eating because my intuition tells me butter and cheese are the greatest but my blood work does not agree.

      1. Joy,

        Haha I hear you on the butter and cheese desires. High cholesterol actually runs in my family so it’s something I’m mindful of. Thanks so much for reading.

        Ps. Sorry my comment posted twice! I thought it didn’t go through for some reason so I resent it.

  2. Hi Marisa and Joy,

    Just wanted to say that I love your podcast and have been a fan for the past couple of years. I have some thoughts on today’s section on food and weight. I am psychotherapist who works with people with eating disorders so this topic interests me. I’m also viewing it from a mental health perspective so I’m definitely not a doctor! I agree with a lot of Marisa’s points on how society puts value judgments on bodies and food. There is a lot of shame and judgment imbedded in diet culture that can be oppressive, especially to those in larger bodies. Which is why I agree with Joy’s point on why people should NOT be shamed for wanting to lose weight and that body autonomy is important. Shaming people is never helpful. I think weight isn’t always an indicator of health nor is it a health behavior. Diet culture sends a message that body size and weight is always within one’s control and can be “fixed” which is simply not the case. Many things such as genetics are out of a person’s control. You might already be aware of this but if you aren’t, I recommend reading up on Health at Every Size as it covers some of the points both of you mentioned in the podcast. I’m a big fan of intuitive eating because it strips those external rules and judgments around food and encourages you to listen your body. And it’s highly adaptable to any lifestyle needs/wants (heart health, diabetes, celiac, vegetarian/ vegan). Thanks for reading 🙂

    Christine

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